dentalblogs.com

dental news for dentists from the best minds in dentistry today

dentalblogs.com header image 2

Dental News: The Root of the Sweet Tooth

November 6th, 2008 · No Comments

dental researchHealth is in. So why are tooth decay, obesity, and diabetes on the rise? A recent study published in Physiological Genomics tells us that people who consume a lot of sugar may have more GLUT2 than others. GLUT2 is a gene that works in the pancreas where sugar is filtered, but may also work in the brain. GLUT2 regulates how much sugar cells allow in.

Dr. El-Sohemy’s team at University of Toronto conducted a study to find out why some people want to eat more sweets than others. The study shows, regardless of age or gender, participants in his study group who consumed more sugar on a daily basis had a higher occurrence of GLUT2. This gene could be responsible for people’s personal preference toward sweets. Those who have a sweet tooth may have more GLUT2.

In this video at UDent, Dr. El-Sohemy tells us that people with high GLUT2 may not have the ability to detect blood sugar changes in the body, so they continue to consume sugar, even when the body has had enough. More information about the study can be found at MedicalNewsToday. To learn about GLUT2, visit The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc. online.

While the study results can’t help people reduce sugar intake, further research based on Dr. El-Sohemy’s findings may lead to a solution that improves oral health, overall health, and quality of life for many people.

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) }

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0pt 5.4pt 0pt 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0pt;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-ansi-language:#0400;
mso-fareast-language:#0400;
mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

dental researchHealth is in. So why are tooth decay, obesity, and diabetes on the rise? A recent study published in Physiological Genomics tells us that people who consume a lot of sugar may have more GLUT2 than others. GLUT2 is a gene that works in the pancreas where sugar is filtered, but may also work in the brain. GLUT2 regulates how much sugar cells allow in.

Dr. El-Sohemy’s team at University of Toronto conducted a study to find out why some people want to eat more sweets than others. The study shows, regardless of age or gender, participants in his study group who consumed more sugar on a daily basis had a higher occurrence of GLUT2. This gene could be responsible for people’s personal preference toward sweets. Those who have a sweet tooth may have more GLUT2.

In this video at UDent, Dr. El-Sohemy tells us that people with high GLUT2 may not have the ability to detect blood sugar changes in the body, so they continue to consume sugar, even when the body has had enough. More information about the study can be found at MedicalNewsToday. To learn about GLUT2, visit The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc. online.

While the study results can’t help people reduce sugar intake, further research based on Dr. El-Sohemy’s findings may lead to a solution that improves oral health, overall health, and quality of life for many people.

Tags: Clinical